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Retail giants Waitrose, John Lewis and Argos have started using renewable biomethane in their lorries.

Posted on Jan 11, 2017 5:37:00 PM

Heavy Good Vehicles (HGV)lorries-min.jpg are some of the most polluting modes of transport. Their large gas engines emit 100 times more carbon dioxide than a normal passenger vehicle. Driving approximately 125,000 miles compared to a car travelling around 7,900 miles per year means that more needs to be done to tackle their negative impact on the environment. The UK based CNG fuel company have created a new biomethane fuel approved by the government’s Renewable Transport Fuel Obligation Scheme (RFTO). The governmental body is including a range of proposals to encourage the uptake of biomethane in the transport sector. Now, retail giants Waitrose, John Lewis and Argos will be using biomethane fuels in their lorries. Waitrose and John Lewis have already invested more than £1 million in CNG trucks.

This decision will not only have a positive impact on the environment but also the retailer's budgets. The cost of fuel is 35-40% cheaper than diesel and emits 70% less carbon dioxide. The launch comes just a couple of days after the government published a lengthy consultation on changes to the RTFO scheme including proposals to incentivise the uptake of biomethane in the transport sector. Justin Laney, General Manager Central Transport, John Lewis Partnership, said: “We are proud to be the first company in the UK to offer its customers RTFO-approved biomethane, and are pleased to be able to do so at the same price as fossil fuel gas.”

The Solihull-based company ( @CNG_FUELS ) is the UK’s only dedicated provider of public access CNG (compressed natural gas) refuelling infrastructure. It operates the UK’s two highest capacity CNG stations, in Leyland, Lancashire, and Crewe, Cheshire. CNG Fuels is targeting operators of high-mileage HGVs, who stand to make the biggest financial savings and carbon impact. HGVs account for 4.2% of UK carbon emissions and 127,000 articulated vehicles travel an average 49,000 miles a year, with many travelling much further. CNG Fuels has sourced enough biomethane to cover its entire CNG fuel supply. It is made from food production waste. It is sourced from anaerobic digestion plants which are not supported by the Renewable Heat Incentive or other subsidy schemes.

Renewable biomethane is distributed through gas pipelines to refuelling stations owned and operated by CNG Fuels where it is compressed into fuel. It is 35%-40% cheaper than diesel and emits 70% less CO2, on a well-to-wheel basis, offering fleet operators the opportunity to cut costs and report dramatic reductions in carbon emissions.

Philip Fjeld, CEO of CNG Fuels, said: “Renewable and sustainably sourced biomethane is the most cost-effective and lowest-carbon alternative to diesel for HGVs, and is attracting increasing interest. We are expanding our refuelling infrastructure nationwide to help fleet operators save money, cut carbon and clean up our air. We are proud to be the first company in the UK to offer its customers RTFO-approved biomethane, and are pleased to be able to do so at the same price as fossil fuel gas.”


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Topics: BBWNBrands, bbwnfuels, biofuels

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About the Author

Emily O'Dowd
Emily O'Dowd
On graduating with a degree in English Literature at Royal Holloway University of London, Emily joined the editorial team. When she isn't writing articles for the website or interviewing experts in th...read more